10 Famous Movies Filmed in Connecticut Last Updated 1/19

Connecticut has always been a favorite location for filmmakers, in fact, quite a few Academy Award-nominated productions have filmed here. The variety and diversity of locations available, coupled with a helpful Film Office, makes the state ideal for television, film and digital shoots. It was difficult to narrow down the list, but here are some of the more well-known movies you may recognize—and the Connecticut towns that played a role.

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Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008)

The fourth movie in the Indiana Jones saga saw stars Harrison Ford and Shia La Beouf filming in several Connecticut locations. New Haven’s Yale University stood in for Indiana Jones’ Marshall College, and Indy even arrived by train, in a scene filmed at the Essex Steam Train and Riverboat in Essex.

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Mystic Pizza (1988)

You can still grab “a slice of heaven” at Mystic Pizza, the place made famous in the Julia Roberts movie of the same name. Although most restaurant scenes were actually filmed in nearby town of Stonington, as well as locations in Mystic, Groton and New Haven. Photo: Samuel Goldwyn Company

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Amistad (1997)

Steven Spielberg seems to be a fan of shooting films in Connecticut. This Academy Award-nominated historic drama about a slave ship mutiny was filmed in both Groton and Mystic, including a ready-built location at the already historic Mystic Seaport Museum, which you can still visit today.

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A Mighty Wind (2003)

This “mockumentary” film about a 1960s folk trio reunited the members of This is Spinal Tap and was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Song. Some scenes were filmed at Mohegan Sun in Uncasville. Photo: Warner Bros.

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War of the Worlds (2005)

Nominated for achievements in sound and visual effects, Steven Spielberg’s 2005 Tom Cruise-starring movie, War of the Worlds, filmed a pivotal, horrifying scene along the Farmington River in Connecticut. Photo: Paramount Pictures

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Revolutionary Road (2008)

Fairfield’s Sasco Beach was one of the many locations for this Academy-Award-nominated film that reunited Titanic stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet. Other Connecticut towns in this production include Trumbull, Beacon Falls, Bethel, Darien, Stamford, Greenwich, New Canaan, Norwalk, Redding, Shelton and Southport. Photo: DreamWorks Pictures

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And So It Goes (2014)

Academy Award winners Michael Douglas and Diane Keaton spent a little time at Bristol’s Lake Compounce Theme Park while filming this romantic comedy directed by Rob Reiner. Other locations in Connecticut include Southport, Greenwich and Bridgeport. Photo: Clarius Entertainment

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Gentleman's Agreement (1947)

Winner of the Academy Awards for Best Picture, Best Supporting Actress and Best Director for Elia Kazan, this drama starring Gregory Peck was hailed as groundbreaking for its commentary on anti-Semitism and bigotry in America. Scenes were filmed in Darien.

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Stanley & Iris (1990)

Even some of Connecticut’s more industrial towns have had their time in the spotlight. Though not a commercial success, this romantic drama with Jane Fonda and Robert DeNiro was filmed in Waterbury using some of the city’s most iconic factories as its backdrop. And during filming, there were widely-covered protests against Fonda by local Vietnam Veterans groups, which led to a meeting in a Waterbury church that both sides found to be healing. Photo: MGM

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The Stepford Wives (1975) and The Stepford Wives (2004)

Norwalk’s grand Lockwood-Mathews Mansion stood in for the Stepford Men’s Association in both the 1975 film, The Stepford Wives, and its 2004 remake. The films take place in Connecticut as well, and scenes for both were also shot in Darien, New Canaan and other towns.

Even if they weren’t filmed here, so many of Hollywood’s most famous movies feature Connecticut as a location. Learn more about Connecticut’s history in film here.