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Cognitive Garden at Avery Point

A sensory garden contains many things to taste, touch, taste, see, and smell, but cognitive growth is enriched when experiential learning and thought become part of the experience.  Cognition means to acquire knowledge through the senses, experience, and thought. A cognitive garden encourages learning through these three processes... Read More

A sensory garden contains many things to taste, touch, taste, see, and smell, but cognitive growth is enriched when experiential learning and thought become part of the experience.  Cognition means to acquire knowledge through the senses, experience, and thought. A cognitive garden encourages learning through these three processes while exposing people to nature. While the beneļ¬ts of nature extend to all ages, young children learn primarily through their senses and the richer those experiences, the more complex their brain structure becomes. Nature offers an array of sensory experiences if children have the ability to immerse themselves and explore. 

Risk-taking is also necessary for development. This garden offers a safe place for children to challenge themselves (I want to climb that boulder!), assess risks (It doesn't seem that high), and develop the appropriate response (maybe I'll just go a little way up and see how I feel). These types of activities help children understand their physical limits but also build self-esteem and confidence through their successes as they conquer a hill or climb a boulder.    

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Location:

University of Connecticut Avery Point
1084 Shennecossett Rd.
Groton, CT 06340

While You're in the Neighborhood